Radon and Lake Tahoe: Homebuyers and Sellers Guide page 10

EPA Guide to Radon
Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon
Page 10


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On this page: b. If Your Home Has Not Yet Been Tested for Radon...

Have a test taken as soon as possible. If you can, test your home before putting it on the market. You should test in the lowest level of the home that could be used regularly. This means testing in the lowest level that you currently live in or a lower level not currently used, but which a buyer might use as a family room or play area, etc. The radon test result is important information about your home's radon level. Some states require radon measurement testers to follow a specific testing protocol. If you do the test yourself, you should carefully follow the testing protocol for your area or EPA's Radon Testing Checklist. If you hire a contractor to test your residence, protect yourself by hiring a qualified* individual or company.

You can determine a service provider's qualifications to perform radon measurements or to mitigate your home in several ways. Check with your state radon office. Many states require radon professionals to be licensed, certified, or registered. Most states can provide you with a list of knowledgeable radon service providers doing business in the state. In states that don't regulate radon services, ask the contractor if they hold a professional proficiency or certification credential. Such programs usually provide members with a photo-ID card,which indicates their qualification(s) and its expiration date. If in doubt, you should check with their credentialing organization. Alternatively, ask the contractor if they've successfully completed formal training appropriate for testing or mitigation, e.g., a course in radon measurement or radon mitigation.

*You should first call your state radon office for information on qualified radon service providers and state-specific radon measurement or mitigation requirements. For up-to-date information on state radon program offices, visit http://www.epa.gov/radon/whereyoulive.html. EPA's detailed and technical guidance on radon measurement and mitigation is included in Section 8 (p. 29); however, state requirements or guidance may be more stringent. Visit http://www.epa.gov/radon/radontest.html for links to private sector radon credentialing programs.


Get your own hardcopy of this Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon publication by the Environmental Protection Agency. Used with permission under public domain and creative commons. Usage: Category Education; License: Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)